Early-Season Rides

Originally posted on Off The Beaten Path:

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The cycling season has started again. In January and February, the Bicycle Quarterly team begins our training with long rides at an unhurried pace. This year, we’ve been lucky with the weather, with many clear days and gorgeous views. Mount Rainier (above)…

cascades_2… the Cascade Mountains in the morning mist…

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…and Mount Baker near sunset.

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Some days have been foggy and wet…

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… but with the right clothing and equipment, we enjoy riding, no matter the weather. (We prefer sunshine, though!)

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Many of our rides now include some gravel, which provides a nice change of scenery and a freedom from traffic.

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We are not in a rush, so there is plenty of time to enjoy the scenery and stop to take photos.

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Most of our rides include a stop at a café, bakery or taco truck.

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Then we look over our bikes leaning against the wall and are grateful for…

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The great Tommy Godwin – 75,065 miles (120,805 Kms)… on a bicycle… in one year… 1939!

Originally posted on Vintage Bicycle:

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Some time ago I wrote a post about my cycling hero G.P.Mills. I called him the ‘ultimate cycling hero’. Recent events lead me to think about another extraordinary cycling hero – Tommy Godwin, who even surpasses the great achievements of Mills. Let’s not get confused here… There is another famous cycling hero called Tommy Godwin, who won two bronze medals at the 1948 Olympics. Here I am talking about the ‘other’ Tommy Godwin…

Born in Fenton, Stoke on Trent in 1912 to a working class family, Tommy was working as a delivery boy by the age of twelve, and took part in his first time trial at the age of fourteen. He soon showed great talent as a time trialist, and won many events at all distances. Before the outbreak of War and now in his mid twenties, he set out to tackle the toughest challenge in cycling history……

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The “Inner Cleveland” of Trendy Cities

Originally posted on Granola Shotgun:

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Check out these photos and try to guess where they were taken. If you thought Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Detroit, Buffalo, Cincinnati, or a dozen other Rustbelt towns you’d be mistaken, although your confusion is completely understandable. It’s actually Portland, Oregon – that bastion of liberal, crunchy, hippie, yuppie, hipster, eco-friendliness. Go figure. I’m not putting down Portland. Portland is great. I love Portland. I’m making a point about the reputation of some cities and how we perceive places differently based on a lot of vague stereotypes. If the only images we ever saw of Portland all looked like this it would be hard to persuade people to migrate there – even if the photos don’t portray the complete reality on the ground. To be perfectly honest, Portland is a small blue collar city out in the sticks with a fairly recent trendy overlay. Its economy is fair-to-middling…

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What is Planing?

Originally posted on Off The Beaten Path:

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Can a 650B randonneur bike climb as well as the best titanium racing bikes? It did climb as well in a Bicycle Quarterly test, and that raised a few eyebrows. After all, the randonneur bike weighed 10 pounds more…

Theoretically, assuming equal power output on each bike, the lighter bike will be faster up the hill. So how could the heavier randonneur bike keep up?

The assumption of “equal power output” lies at the root of many misunderstandings about bicycle performance. A rider’s power output varies with many factors, like fatigue and comfort. One factor often has been overlooked: How well the bike’s frame gets in sync with the rider’s pedal strokes also affects how much power the rider can put out.

On different bikes, the same rider will have different power outputs. Optimize the bike’s flex characteristics, and your rider will be able to put out more power.

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Vision 0.08

Vision 0.08: Why any major safe-streets effort must tackle alcohol by A.J. Zelada

Consider this: If Alcohol, Inc., were a publicly traded corporation and associated with more than 10,000 deaths in 2012 (about a quarter of them among people biking and walking) why would money not be thrown that direction?

Why is there no public outrage? Why is there no greater accountability expected, as we have with GM?